Episode 123 | Posted on

Secrets to Social Media Marketing at Scale: Laura Roeder

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Don’t miss expert social media strategies with @MeetEdgar founder Laura Roeder @lkr on today’s @mktg_speak podcast. Click To Tweet

This Week’s Guest:

Believe it or not, only 5 to 10% of your Twitter and Facebook followers see any given thing that you post. Most people, however, spend precious time coming up with multiple posts per day. This doesn’t make sense considering 90% of content goes unseen. The key to social media is repurposing content. Repurposing is a fast and easy way to get content in front of a larger slice of your audience. Best of all, it makes sure you don’t waste energy creating new content that most of your followers will never see.

 

 

In this conversation with Laura Roeder, you’ll learn about the magic of repurposing in your social media marketing. Laura is founder of Edgar, a social media automation tool that she designed when she was frustrated with the limitations of the other options available. In addition to founding Edgar, Laura has given talks at prominent conferences and has appeared in Forbes, Mashable, and other major publications.

 

 

Find Out More About Laura Here:

Laura Roeder
Edgar
@lkr on Twitter
Laura Roeder on LinkedIn
Laura Roeder on Facebook

 

 

In This Episode:

  • [01:08] – Laura talks about what inspired her to create Edgar, as well as explaining what Edgar does and why it’s so important.
  • [03:35] – We hear about reposting or repurposing content across various platforms.
  • [05:57] – What’s Laura’s take on the organic side of Facebook as opposed to the paid side? Her experience is primarily organic, she explains.
  • [07:45] – Laura never uses Facebook profiles for her marketing, she explains, and clarifies that they’re a software company rather than a consulting group.
  • [10:28] – Laura discusses some of the other platforms, particularly Instagram, which she points out is growing quickly.
  • [12:58] – What is Laura doing in terms of Instagram marketing for her own company?
  • [14:54] – Pinterest is definitely more favorable toward visual companies, Laura points out, but can drive a lot of traffic regardless.
  • [17:07] – Snapchat isn’t compelling to marketers anymore, unless you’re marketing to teens, Laura explains.
  • [18:05] – Where does LinkedIn fit into Laura’s strategy, both for her own company and for clients?
  • [19:45] – Laura clarifies how Edgar works on LinkedIn.
  • [20:29] – We hear Laura’s thoughts on reposting content from your own blog on other platforms.
  • [22:44] – Stephan brings up one more social platform that he and Laura haven’t talked about yet: YouTube. It’s a whole different kind of content, he explains, but has huge potential for reaching your audience. Laura then talks about why YouTube is underutilized.
  • [24:48] – Stephan doesn’t spend much time on SlideShare, but he thinks it’s pretty cool. Laura then shares her thoughts on the platform.
  • [27:46] – Laura walks us through a repurposing strategy that might work for a company with an intangible product. She also mentions her Facebook Live videos, which you can find on Edgar’s Facebook page!
  • [30:42] – Laura offers a piece of advice specific to podcasts.
  • [32:42] – Using cheap labor instead of a tool to make your Facebook videos will make your videos stand out more from the competition.
  • [33:27] – How do you get verified on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter? Has Laura gotten verified on any of them, and how?
  • [35:51] – We hear a bit more about the good, the bad, and the ugly of startup culture in the investment world.
  • [37:12] – Laura talks about how she initially funded her company with profits from her previous business.
  • [38:06] – There wasn’t one single particular moment at which things really started taking off for Edgar.
  • [39:57] – Stephan takes a moment to share his origin story.
  • [42:14] – What would be an example of a time when Laura stepped outside of her comfort zone and something fantastic happened?
  • [44:12] – We hear what Laura is doing these days in terms of personifying her brand.
  • [45:28] – Laura clarifies what she means in terms of not believing in MRR. Stephan then talks about a previous episode with Jared Spool that involves vanity metrics.
  • [48:00] – Stephan elaborates on Laura’s point that MRR does not equate to cash flow. He then discusses different kinds of cash.
  • [49:30] – What is Laura doing to differentiate Edgar from the competition, such as Buffer and Hootsuite? She also discusses whether she has gotten acquisition inquiries from any of these companies.
  • [51:25] – Laura doesn’t offer free trials, and explains why.

 

 Links and Resources:

 

Your Checklist of Actions to Take

☑ Always share newly published content on all of my social media profiles. Don’t forget to post on the top 3 social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

☑ Share the same content multiple times on my social media profiles. Only around 2% of my audience sees my content in real time so it’s okay to do repeat posts.

 

☑ Share my content at the right time. Consider where my audience lives and make sure to post according to their respective time zones.

 

☑ Familiarize myself with the different kinds of social media platforms. My post activity should be different on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

 

☑ Focus on visually driven content by using Instagram and Pinterest. Create high-impact images that will catch the viewers’ attention.

 

☑ Create engagement on my social media posts so that algorithms will keep showing my content.

 

☑ Regularly evaluate my social media analytics. See what posts people respond to and what’s working on my page.

 

☑ Read blogs such as Edgar’s to learn about the best practices for posting content on social media.

 

☑ Extend the life of my articles by repurposing them into different types of content such as infographics, short videos or listicles.

 

☑ Check out Edgar to manage and automate my social media with ease and convenience.

 

Transcript

S: In this episode number 123, you are going to learn about the magic of repurposing in your social media marketing. Write once, use many. You’re also going to learn about bootstrapping a business and creating a memorable brand for it. Our guest today is Laura Roeder. She’s the founder of Edgar, a social media automation tool designed to prevent status updates from going to waste. Laura has given talks at conferences like BlogHer and South by Southwest and has spoken about the value of independent entrepreneurship at the White House. She’s also appeared in Forbes, Fast Company, Mashable, CNET, and other major publications. Laura, it’s great to have you on the show.

 

L: Thank you. I’m happy to be here.

 

S: First of all, let’s talk about Edgar and what spurred you on to create a social media automation platform?

 

L: Before I launched Edgar, I was doing social media training for entrepreneurs and MeetEdgar is actually a software that does for you the system that I was teaching. Basically, before people started talking about Facebook reach, I noticed how low it was. I was looking at my stats and saw, man, on Facebook, on Twitter, you’re getting often 5%, maybe sometimes, 10% of your audience who ask to be there, who’s following you, sees anything that you posts. 90% of your followers aren’t seeing it yet the way most people handle social media, they’re coming up with the new social updates multiple times a day, every day, for the rest of the time. It really doesn’t make sense to create that much brand new content every day when 90% of your audience or more is not seeing it. It really makes sense to repurpose this so that more people can get a chance to see it. That’s exactly what Edgar does.

 

S: This is a really key point. We’re wasting a ton of resources on social media because we’re not getting the reach, we’re just creating stuff that’s going to a tiny sliver of our entire audience. When we’re creating something, we’re creating for the entire audience, thinking it’s going out to the audience and it’s going out to a small fraction.

 

Continue reading…

 

 

 

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